How did you shoot that bi-plane?

 1938 vintage RAF Tiger Moth.

1938 vintage RAF Tiger Moth.

Sometimes your client just doesn't get it or wants the image straight from the camera. Post-production just isn't part of the process. And that's the potential fault line in the relationship because, after all, they've seen your website and like what you do, so why not let you do it for them. Straight from the camera, the images frequently just don't have the traction that both photographer and client might expect. And particularly so after a time constrained shoot. 

This image is from one such shoot. But this is my finished 'photographer's version'. The job was for a story on flying farmers. I was fly parallel in a Cessna. Although it was a bright day with hazy sunshine the image needed enhancement at the very least and some serious post production if possible. 

 Raw file straight from camera 

Raw file straight from camera 

The first issue that needed attention was the overall contrast and colour. This was resolved with a serious desaturation of the green channel. And contrast was increased to get the light gray of the plane to pop out from the background.

But of greater importance was that the scale of the environment wasn't being expressed so a section from another frame was added to show the hill top. The wispy clouds were sourced from a holiday image and flare added from photoshop. 

Yes, it's manipulation and a complete lie if you simply see photography as recording the 'truth'. And maybe there are positions within the editorial sector that insist on straight imagery but this isn't news reportage and it won't be the last image to go through post production. Discuss.